Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Pink Leaves


I found pink corn leaves in a field of green corn yesterday and got a picture of it. I promptly sent it to our State Extension Plant Pathologist and he asked for samples.

We shouldn't be seeing pink corn leaves on this 90 day old corn. It doesn't match Anthracnose or any of the known corn diseases except Goss's Wilt. I will keep you abreast of what becomes of this.

We are getting tropical storm showers off Hurricane Lee as it slowly leaves the state. This is much better than Hurricane Ike that came up the Gulf and blew of roofs and barn doors 3 years ago while it scorched every plant in its path.

The weather people are calling for a chance of rain all week, 70% today and 30-40% the rest of the week. That is good news for soybean farmers, in fact, I think it is God answered prayer.

All the market prices took a tumble yesterday except for the ones we consumers buy. Gas is still $3.75 at the pump. This volatile marketplace really makes you wonder what to buy or sell and I think people and companies keep buying and selling just what they need to, if they can.

Farmers are trying to finish mowing and slowly get ready for harvest and fall soil preparation from cover crops to ripping to fertilization.

That's all I have for now, have a great day!

Ed Winkle

4 comments:

  1. The State Pathologist will probably say that pink corn was "born that way." ^-^

    Hey, do I compute it right when I see on agweb corn production cost estimates are around $800/acre, so basically, at $7.55/bushel, the first 100 bushels/acre or so are just written off?

    I know you need to invest money to make money, but such a high cost/revenue ratio seems insane, especially in the areas affected by the drought that might be far below the 100 bushels/acre mark.

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  2. The world is insane and farming has become an insane business. The key is do it cheaper and I have met experts that are even tighter than I am.

    This is why crop insurance is pretty well mandatory now so you can hope to recover most of your costs in a bad year.

    You figured it out, we are nuts. Farming is in our blood and it runs deep. Remember we lost half our farmers in 84 and probably a bunch since then. Many won't or can't play this game but the ones who can are lined up to do it.

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  3. I'd like the email contact of Ed Winkle, please send to me on rafael.salerno@gmail.com

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  4. My email is listed in my blog today Rafael and you also have mail.

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